The Josias Podcast, Episode V: Liberalism (Part 2)

Restlessly seek power after power ceasing only in death, or just try to be a little crueler every day? Wherein the gang flows along the surface of life’s path as they please; unleash Newman’s critique of political liberalism; ponder what it means for liberal education that Basil and Julian were fellow-students at the schools of Athens; decry the shortcomings and superficialities of great books educations; and ask whether Christians can be gentlemen in the end.

All this and much more!

Bibliography for pts 1 & 2:

If you have questions or comments, please send them to editors@thejosias.com. We’d love the feedback.

P.S. Podcast production is not free—if you would like to help us out or show your support for The Josias, we now have a Patreon page where you can set up a one-time or recurring donation in any amount. Even $1 a month would be awesome. Click here for more.

The Josias Podcast, Episode V: Liberalism (Part 1)

 

The philosophers have only interpreted liberals in various ways. The point, however, is to own them.

Wherein liberalism is said in many ways, and revealed in Strauss’s war on the Redemptorists, and whether or not the Abbot of Heiligenkreuz should have the power of life or death over local peasants. The hosts (sans Elliot) are joined by Felix de St Vincent, for a rousing discussion over what liberalism is, when it began, and whether it is necessary to be “cruel to be kind, in the right measure.”

Stay tuned for part 2 where we determine whether opposing liberalism means embracing cruelty, discuss Cardinal Newman’s definition of a gentleman, and much more.

If you have questions or comments, please send them to editors@thejosias.com. We’d love the feedback.

P.S. Podcast production is not free—if you would like to help us out or show your support for The Josias, we now have a Patreon page where you can set up a one-time or recurring donation in any amount.  Even $1 a month would be awesome.  Click here for more.

The Josias Podcast, Episode IV: Nature, Natural Ends, and the Enlightenment (Part 2)

Building off our previous conversation, this episode (iTunesGoogle Play) takes the question of nature and natural ends more into the modern era. What’s going on with natural order in the work of modern philosophers like Descartes, Hume, and Kant? What should we think about all of this? What does Pope Francis say? We promise it won’t put you to sleep, unless you’re trying to fall asleep.

 

The Josias Podcast, Episode IV: Nature, Natural Ends, and the Enlightenment (Part 1)

Do rocks have purpose? Are they essentially headed somewhere? What about plants? Humans? The stars? In part one of this episode (iTunesGoogle Play) we touch on a bunch of questions related to the idea that the universe is ordered and things have intrinsic ends. The episode kicks off with some awesome music taken from the film Koyaanisqatsi, and continues with a riveting discussion of Aristotle, celestial bodies, and the implications of the idea of intrinsic ends for our worldview at large.

If you have questions or comments, please send them to editors@thejosias.com. We’d love the feedback.

 

On the City of God Against the Pagans

Alan Fimister


The doctrine of the two cities, which finds its greatest expression in the work we are to examine today, is not the construct of some theologian, however great. It is an essential element in God’s revelation to mankind, vital to the correct understanding of the personal and institutional history of each individual and society and of every book of scripture from Genesis to Revelation. The great Pope Leo XIII frequently alluded to this doctrine in his encyclical letters, not least in the thundering opening of Humanum Genus promulgated in 1884.

“The race of man, after its miserable fall from God, the Creator and the Giver of heavenly gifts, ‘through the envy of the devil,’ separated into two diverse and opposite parts, of which the one steadfastly contends for truth and virtue, the other for those things which are contrary to virtue and to truth. The one is the kingdom of God on earth, namely, the true Church of Jesus Christ; and those who desire from their heart to be united with it, so as to gain salvation, must of necessity serve God and His only-begotten Son with their whole mind and with an entire will. The other is the kingdom of Satan, in whose possession and control are all whosoever follow the fatal example of their leader and of our first parents, those who refuse to obey the divine and eternal law, and who have many aims of their own in contempt of God, and many aims also against God. This twofold kingdom St. Augustine keenly discerned and described after the manner of two cities, contrary in their laws because striving for contrary objects; and with a subtle brevity he expressed the efficient cause of each in these words: ‘Two loves formed two cities: the love of self, reaching even to contempt of God, an earthly city; and the love of God, reaching to contempt of self, a heavenly one.’ At every period of time each has been in conflict with the other, with a variety and multiplicity of weapons and of warfare, although not always with equal ardour and assault.”

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The Josias Podcast, Episode III: Basic Concepts – Right, Rights, and the Law

What does it mean for something to be someone’s “right”? What is “a right”? Turns out “right” and “law” are closer in meaning than you might think. Joined by a guest, in this episode (iTunesGoogle Play) we cover the main points of classical and modern rights theory. Along the way we’ll talk about Spanish painters, Austrian democracy, and what to do when a mob of townspeople destroys your property.

If you have questions or comments, please send them to hhg.josias.rex@gmail.com. We’d love the feedback.

 P.S. Podcast production is not free—if you would like to help us out or show your support for The Josias, we now have a Patreon page where you can set up a one-time or recurring donation in any amount.  Even $1 a month would be awesome.  Click here for more.

 

The Josias Podcast, Episode II: Basic Concepts – Integralism

Antiliberalism? Illiberalism? Crypto-neo-facsco-socialist-theocracy? In this episode (iTunesGoogle Play), we discuss a variety of jargon terms used to describe different schools of Catholic political thought. And we talk about Freemasons. And Mozart. And Sicilian uprisings. And many other things. We had so much fun we just kept going for 90 minutes, so pace yourself, dear listener. Lots of goodness ahead.

The Josias Podcast, Episode I: Basic Concepts – The Common Good

“The Common Good” is a bland, empty phrase that gets tossed around a lot. In our inaugural podcast, ( iTunes) the editors of The Josias are here to take back The Common Good and give it some substance. Along the way we’ll encounter some Nazis, do battle with unnamed French Thomists, and record and delete an entire 12 minute segment about Schubert.

The Sin of Usury

I. Introduction[1]

To the extent that usury is thought of or discussed today it is usually understood as the charging of excessive interest on loans, especially perhaps on a consumer loan as opposed to a business loan. Although the charging of high rates of interest is indeed a real social and political evil, this is not the classical understanding of usury. Rather usury, as that has been discussed for centuries in Catholic theology and condemned again and again by the Church, means the taking of any interest on any type of loan, simply by virtue of the loan contract. The most complete papal treatment of usury is found in the 1745 encyclical of Pope Benedict XIV, Vix Pervenit, the relevant portions of which run, Continue reading